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      H C Davis, father of Greg Davis, started working in and around cotton in the 1940’s. In the early 50’s H C helped operate the first 2 row John Deere self-propelled cotton picker in the state of Georgia. The picker was owned by B G and J H Alexander, which were neighbors to H C.

      In the early 1960’s, H C started growing his own cotton. Benny Johnston, Greg’s uncle, bought his first cotton picker. H C and Benny used the picker to harvest for each other and some of the area farmers’ cotton as well. 

      The boll weevil was ruthless in the 70’s and for economic reasons, H C stopped growing cotton.  In 1986, during the boll weevil eradication program, HC and Benny got back in the cotton business with 30 acres.  

      In 1988, H C and Benny bought two 2 row pickers, which they used to pick cotton for the public.  Each year the two of them increased their planted and harvested acres.

      H C retired in 2003, and Greg, his son, took over the farming operation.

      When Greg was born, farming was already in his heart and blood.  His mother, Lola Davis, says as a young boy, Greg would plant a garden.  He made sure the rows were straight and there were no weeds in sight. Lola says his harvested vegetables tasted better than any bought at a grocery store.  

      Greg worked day and night doing whatever needed to be done for that garden to be the best.  This was a legacy passed to him from his Dad and Uncle Benny. Greg still has this same mentality with his whole farming operation today.

      Greg met Kim, who lived on her grandfather’s farm in Berrien County. They married and live in Kelltown, where they reside on the Davis family farm. They have two children, Brian and Amber.  

      Kim was raised on a farm consisting of cows, hogs and corn. It was very interesting and different to move into a farming operation which harvested cotton, peanuts and then in later years watermelons.  

      Kim now works at the Tift County Farm Service Agency where she gives Greg all credit for planting within her the seed of love she has for helping farmers.  

      Today, Greg Davis Farms LLC consist of 1500 acres of owned and rented land where cotton, corn, peanuts and watermelons are grown.  With the Lords help, Greg and Kim work together on a day to day, sometimes hour to hour basis, to keep the farming operation going.  

      At the end of the day, Greg and Kim say that their love of farming started because others before them tilled the soil and planted that love with deep roots.